Emma Mason

  • This major biography tells of England's most irreligious king, famously killed accidentally whilst hunting in the New Forest. Or was he? The future William II was born in the late 1050s the third son of William the Conqueror. The younger William - nicknamed Rufus because of his ruddy cheeks - at first had not great expectations of succeeding to the throne. The situation changed when Robert, the Conqueror's eldest son, repeatedly rebelled against his father, and Richard, the king's second son, was killed in a hunting accident in the New Forest. When The Conqueror was dying in 1087, he designated William as heir to the English throne. Emma Mason's biography tells the story of William Rufus, King of England from 1087-1100 and reveals for the first time the truth behind his death, in the thirteenth year of his troubled reign, settling one of medieval England's most enduring mysteries.

  • In recent decades, reception history has become an increasingly important and controversial topic of discussion in biblical studies. Rather than attempting to recover the original meaning of biblical texts, reception history focuses on exploring the history of interpretation. In doing so it locates the dominant historical-critical scholarly paradigm within the history of interpretation, rather than over and above it. At the same time, the breadth of material and
    hermeneutical issues that reception history engages with questions any narrow understanding of the history of the Bible and its effects on faith communities.

    The challenge that reception history faces is to explore tradition without either reducing its meaning to what faith communities think is important, or merely offering anthologies of interesting historical interpretations. This major new handbook addresses these matters by presenting reception history as an enterprise (not a method) that questions and understands tradition afresh.

    The Oxford Handbook of the Reception History of the Bible consciously allows for the interplay of the traditional and the new through a two-part structure. Part I comprises a set of essays surveying the outline, form, and content of twelve key biblical books that have been influential in the history of interpretation. Part II offers a series of in-depth case studies of the interpretation of particular key biblical passages or books with due regard for the specificity of their social,
    cultural or aesthetic context.

    These case studies span two millennia of interpretation by readers with widely differing perspectives. Some are at the level of a group response (from Gnostic readings of Genesis, to Post-Holocaust Jewish interpretations of Job); others examine individual approaches to texts (such as Augustine and Pelagius on Romans, or Gandhi on the Sermon on the Mount). Several chapters examine historical moments, such as the 1860 debate over Genesis and evolution, while others look to wider themes such as
    non-violence or millenarianism. Further chapters study in detail the works of popular figures who have used the Bible to provide inspiration for their creativity, from Dante and Handel, to Bob Dylan and Dan Brown.

  • This Companion explores the Bible's role and influence on individual writers, whilst tracing the key developments of Biblical themes and literary theory through the ages.An ambitious overview of the Bible's impact on English literature as arguably the most powerful work of literature in history from the medieval period through to the twentieth-centuryIncludes introductory sections to each period giving background information about the Bible as a source text in English literature, and placing writers in their historical contextDraws on examples from medieval, early-modern, eighteenth-century and Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist literatureIncludes many 'secular' or 'anti-clerical' writers alongside their 'Christian' contemporaries, revealing how the Bible's text shifts and changes in the writing of each author who reads and studies it

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